Directions: Begin each of these workouts with a five-minute warmup, or go through the moves after you’ve done your usual cardio or strength training when you’re already warm. Each should also begin with 20 reps of what Fitzgerald calls “transverse pullbacks”—where you pull your navel toward your spine, as if bracing yourself against a sucker punch—as a way to activate the muscles for the work you’re about to ask of them. You’ll also need some dumbbells for some of these moves.
Why it made the list: There are many reasons to like leg raise variations, but one is their scalability. You can start doing bent knee raises in the Roman chair or ab straps to focus on the lower core, work up to straight leg raises, and then move to a hanging bar. By the time you can do full straight-leg toes-to-bar raises, your entire core will have strength for days.
This is exactly the type of article I was looking for. I’m female 5’1” and a runner. I weighed 115 until I started at the gym and now I’m about 118 but like the way I look better now because everything is tightening and I can already see some definition. I don’t have a lot of body fat but particularly I have a very thin midsection. I don’t eat clean but I do keep track of my calories and keep a balance. Honestly I don’t want to be any thinner and don’t want to lose my curves by losing any weight but I want abs! Any extra weight I carry on my lower body (which is why I run!). But I want abs without having to cut out my iced coffee! So as long as I keep up with my calories and keep a low body fat I can still get abs? I am ab training about 3 times a week. Sorry for the book! Lol! Just blindly trying to reach my goals on my own!
As they do, you should try to include at least one of the exercises described herein into your personal training program two times a week. These exercises can be made more difficult, but I seldom advise more than 10 – 20 slow reps on any of them. You should increase the resistance with these exercises rather than the reps; and if you’re working hard enough, you should only perform 2-3 sets per exercise. I would also suggest that you not perform any single exercise for more than three weeks in a row, since well-conditioned muscles adapt quickly to any exercise, and this adaptation must be minimized.

Try starting your day off eating heavier, and ending on a light dinner. Instead of waking up and running out of the door with a banana, eating a small lunch, and then eating a hefty dinner, try making your breakfast your heaviest meal and your dinner the lightest. For carb intake at dinner time, try to ingest the wet types of carbs that are in high-water, medium-fiber foods.
This is exactly the type of article I was looking for. I’m female 5’1” and a runner. I weighed 115 until I started at the gym and now I’m about 118 but like the way I look better now because everything is tightening and I can already see some definition. I don’t have a lot of body fat but particularly I have a very thin midsection. I don’t eat clean but I do keep track of my calories and keep a balance. Honestly I don’t want to be any thinner and don’t want to lose my curves by losing any weight but I want abs! Any extra weight I carry on my lower body (which is why I run!). But I want abs without having to cut out my iced coffee! So as long as I keep up with my calories and keep a low body fat I can still get abs? I am ab training about 3 times a week. Sorry for the book! Lol! Just blindly trying to reach my goals on my own!

Despite the fact that sit-ups been widely rebuked—everyone from Harvard Medical School to the U.S. Army advises against performing them—you shouldn’t discount the classic move just yet. The sit-up’s “primary function is to work your rectus abdominis, which are those six-pack muscles that most people want,” says Katie Barrett, lead instructor at B/SPOKE Cycling Studio in Boston and a certified personal trainer. “But doing that full sit-up is also going to work your hip flexors and other stabilizing core muscles.” The key is making sure you’re doing them correctly. (And here’s how to do just that).


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Now you can shred your abs like a skier shreds the slopes, with the dumbbell skier swing.

 Gaddour took the typical form a downhill skier uses when flying down the face of a mountain, and combined it with the action of a kettlebell swing. The combination results in a superfast exercise that simultaneously torches fat, builds explosive strength, and works your entire core from your shoulders to your hips.
Hi I’m 14 and a girl I know it’s young but I hate my body I’m currently 60.9kg saying it’s a healthy weight but I want toned abs so I can feel good about my body and not care about my face but I don’t want to lose weight because I’d be underweight and unhealthy , I have a bit of stomach fat and my normal routine is the 100 sit up challenge for 100 days , but I can never diet because I’m a very fussy eater i can’t eat brown rice or any vegetables the only healthy foods I eat is brown bread strawberries and oranges the rest is all junk but I’m wondering do I need to diet to see my abs because if not could you suggest things to do to help without dieting note I’ll be joining a gym soon but at the moment I’m doing home excersises sorry for the long paragraph
A. If you’re someone who just can’t do without eating something, by all means don’t give it up. I personally find it very hard to let go of bread completely so it’s a part of my daily meals. A rule of thumb to follow is “IIFYM-If It Fits Your Macros”. This allows you to be flexible with the food you eat while making sure it doesn’t impact your overall nutrition requirements.
The rectus abdominis is the muscle you think of when you think "abs." It's the outermost abdominal muscle, and runs vertically along each side of your abdominal wall. The transverse abdominis is the deepest muscle of the abdominal wall, which means it's closest to your spine, and basically wraps around your torso between your ribs and your hips. The oblique muscles run along the sides of your torso, and there are two sets: internal and external. The internal obliques lie above the transverse abdominis, and then the external obliques are on top of those (they're the most superficial of the bunch). There's also a handful of other smaller muscles in this area—what we call the core—that work to stabilize the spine and allow us to bent and twist and lift without hurting ourselves.
That's because it’s insanely hard to get ripped abs. “Every woman’s body is built differently, so it varies, but generally speaking it takes a lot of time and dedication to get those abs to show,” says Amanda Butler, C.P.T., instructor at The Fhitting Room in New York City (and a fitness model who has her own fierce six-pack). “It can take anywhere from three months to a year to get a six-pack, and it’s not just about doing a ton of abs exercises.”
“I alternate between all-out effort sprints (30 to 60 seconds) and walk/jog as a recovery until I feel fatigued. Intensity is key. Abs work as stabilizing muscles during a sprint, so the harder I push myself the harder my abs will work! Plus, there’s no equipment required, and I get a high calorie burn and full-body workout done in very little time. (I tell myself I can do anything for 30 seconds.) Depending on how I feel, I’ll either add this to the end of a routine or make it my entire workout, two to three times a week.” —Suzanne Cover, @suzannecover 

Muscles exert higher EMG tension when they are contracting eccentrically (lowering the resistance) versus raising it; but the problem with most exercises is that the amount of weight you can lower is limited by how much you can lift positively (concentric work). This exercise compensates for the problem by changing the leverage during the lowering (eccentric) phase of the exercise.
Tighten your abdominal muscles and protect your spine with the most effective ab exercises from the American Council on Exercise (ACE). Learn proper techniques and step-by-step instruction from America's Authority on Fitness. This large collection of exercises is also featured in complete workout routines that include full-body and at-home workouts. Whether you?re looking for beginner level training or advanced fitness programs, we have something here for everyone to target core muscle groups. Choose from a wide variety of lower ab exercises, standing trunk rotations, reverse crunches and more.
I am older turning 65 this year. I did the diet stuff about 8 years ago. In 2010 or so I was about 170 I had lost over 40 lbs. I was too sedentary. My diet which is more a way of life is mostly white meat. Milk must be skim, Drink water no soda. Eat lots of whole grains, veggies, nuts, seeds etc. Noticed maybe over a year ago if I breathed in I could see some abs. Now I don’t need to breath in. I have a handicap so am limited at the gym but do leg raises and use abdominal machines at the gym.I call mine a minor 6 pac.I don’t raise my shirt at the gym lol but have had a few stares from others as I guess you can see them through my shirt. So I think it does have a lot to do with diet but exercise will make them more prominent.
Some experts recommend eating six small meals a day, instead of the more conventional three, cutting out added sugars and processed foods, and loading up on dependable sources of protein to help build new muscle in your midsection. Before you commit to any new diet, though, speak to your doctor and/or a nutritionist to see what they believe will work best for you.

Nothing says fit like a washboard stomach. But scoring high-definition abs isn't as easy as cranking out crunch after crunch. To sculpt a stronger, more chiseled core, you need the best ab workout to work the two dozen muscles between your hips and your shoulders in the many ways they function. After all, your abs do more than flex on a daily basis—they stabilize and rotate, too.
I use the ab machines at the gym. I do a couple variations on crunches (sitting up and lying down both on machines with weights. I can crunch 55lbs on the one that’s sitting position, 40 on the other), hanging leg lifts (which kill my shoulders), the oblique twist machine, as well as full body workouts. I just started the gym about 2 months ago and have really upped the weight since then so my body is definitely progressing.
Lie on your back and bend your knees, placing a Swiss ball across your hips. With your hands on top of the ball and your body crunched forward as demonstrated, push your arms down as hard as possible for six seconds. The harder you push, the more the ball will resist you, giving your abs an intense stimulus. Exhale, relax for a few seconds, and then repeat.
First off, it's easy to sit back while doing this move, letting your hip flexors do much of the work. Second, if you keep a flat back, it limits the degree to which you can hit the upper abdominals—your back has to round! And finally, your hands should stay in the same relative position next to your head for the duration of the set. Letting them drift away on the eccentric and then pulling them back again beside your head brings a lot of shoulder and upper body into the move.
For training, you need to set a serious pace for when you hit the gym. Standing around your overloaded squat bar that you were going to do quarter reps on every five minutes won’t cut it. Start serious volume short-rest training by laying a smackdown on your muscles. Building mass comes at the price of getting lean, so maintenance and permanent pump will be the strategy—the results will be worth it. For training you’re going to do 4 exercises at 4 sets and 12 reps minimum per body part approach. It’s encouraged to do 5 or even 6 sets, and if you’re not struggling with those, then go further. When it comes to abs, slow and steady wins the race. I know it sounds cliché, but large range-of-motion reps with added weight for your 12 reps will produce far deeper cuts than doing 50 crappy situps. Give yourself at least a 4-count per rep on your abs.
If you're taking on healthy fitness and eating habits with the dream of achieving a six-pack, some real talk for you: "Very few people can achieve this look, regardless of what they do," says Stephen Ball, professor of nutrition and exercise physiology at the University of Missouri. "Most women who make this their goal will fail and ultimately give up on exercise all together." Way harsh, Tai.
I am older turning 65 this year. I did the diet stuff about 8 years ago. In 2010 or so I was about 170 I had lost over 40 lbs. I was too sedentary. My diet which is more a way of life is mostly white meat. Milk must be skim, Drink water no soda. Eat lots of whole grains, veggies, nuts, seeds etc. Noticed maybe over a year ago if I breathed in I could see some abs. Now I don’t need to breath in. I have a handicap so am limited at the gym but do leg raises and use abdominal machines at the gym.I call mine a minor 6 pac.I don’t raise my shirt at the gym lol but have had a few stares from others as I guess you can see them through my shirt. So I think it does have a lot to do with diet but exercise will make them more prominent.
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